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kitten
popular pet in Saudi. Mostly African Greys and Cocatoos, but lots of others are available in the market.

One of our Web masters, Amy Stevens, who lives in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, reports that she has adopted another wild Saudi kitten, pictured here. He is the brother of the big ginger cat pictured in a previous article now appearing in the archives. This kitten is from a different litter but same “utterly wild parents,” Amy says.

Amy says that the cats in Saudi are similar to the cats in the US, but they definitely have a wild streak.

According to Web information, most cats in Saudi derive directly or indirectly from the enormous feral cat population. The feral cats, especially those crossed with imported cats, generally make excellent pets when adopted. Most actually adopt the owner who is given little choice! There are thousands of cute kittens waiting to be picked up from the street.

The cat is a popular pet in Saudi. The Saudis love cats and love their cats to reproduce. Most popular are the long hairy breeds so it is fairly easy to find a Persian or Persian type cat. Surprisingly, the Parrot is the most

New ginger kitten for Web master in Saudi

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Peaches
them and guide them through the course.

And: Cat agility is a sport where a handler directs or lures a cat through an obstacle course as quickly as possible. Good agility cats have qualities to make happy, healthy competition cats. The most successful are those who love to play, have outstanding personalities, are in good physical condition. Agility, as they say, is like a playground to a cat.

The website offers dozens of photos, training tips and videos.

Peaches
Agility competition is to cats as agility competition is to, well, dogs. It's all sort of the same – but different. Cat agility competitions are growing in numbers and popularity. They are sponsored by  iCAT, the International Cat Agility Tournament organization, and often held in conjunction with cat shows.

According to the iCATS website: Cat agility is a new category of cat competition in which cats negotiate an obstacle course designed to display their speed, coordination, beauty of movement, physical conditioning, intelligence, timing and the quality and depth of their relationship with their owners, who train

Cat agility: something new for felines

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Beautiful Peaches was only a four-month-old kitten when she found her way into a friend's barn. The owner found her nestled on a saddle early one morning. Now she's a cuddly, beautiful cat with a luscious coat who loves sitting on the split-rail fence and visiting with “her” Mini.
Peaches
Peaches

Peaches found her own home!

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over the weekends, so volunteer Brenda Wilson took him home. She had never cared for such a young kitten before, so Brenda made sure she did everything right, including finding a “nurse” to stand in for her when she had to be out of town! Her efforts were not in vain, as you can see. He is now seven months old and a much loved member of the Wilson family.

You can visit animals available for adoption at www.pets911.com.

The Grant County Animal Shelter is located at 218 Barnes Rd., Williamstown, KY 41039. (859) 428-1039. The shelter director is Jeremy Souder. His email is: jsouder@grantco.org.

Did you know:

* Approximately 1.5 million purebred   pets are taken to shelters each year   (at any given time 25% -30% of pets in   shelters are purebred)?

* Approximately 10 million pets are   euthanized each year in America   (that's 192,308 per week or 27,473   pets euthanized every day; or 1 pet   every 4 seconds)?

* For every person born in the U.S., 15   puppies and 45 kittens are also  born?

Phoenix, the pretty black cat pictured here, weighed 10 pounds at his last vet check in January. But life wasn't all that cushy for him when he was a baby. He was droppedPhoenix
last June at the Grant County, KY Animal Shelter as a found, three-week-old kitten.

When he was being photographed for the local newspaper adoption column, the staff realized he needed bottle feeding around the clock. The shelter was not staffed to handle his feeding schedule evenings or

Phoenix rises, thanks to his friends

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all in one kitty care center

There are plenty of scratching areas, too -- four altogether with options for adding more. Price is
from $450.

Shopping for cats or cat lovers? Visit  catsplay.com. You're sure to find something to please every feline fancier from fine jewelry, toys and gifts, feeding and home gadgets, carriers and beds to the ultimate scratching post.

With the number of cat pets in the US now exceeding dogs, the quantity of cat stuff on this site proves that cat people are spending lots of money making sure their feline friends are comfortable and pampered.

For example, there is a huge section of cat furniture: dozens of gyms and condos, rustic and novelty trees, scratching posts, and several window perches.

Topping it all are the nearly 50 models of “litter box concealment” items. Reading the brand names is entertainment: the Poop Boxaroo, Electric Littermaid, Clean Step Litter Box, Purrforma Plus, Jambo Hooded Litter Appliance, the Booda Domb.

Also offered are litter box concealers that double as end tables and cabinets and are manufactured in dozens of finishes including maple, white-washed and dark cherry, some complete with stained glass inserts.

We're partial to the huge All-in-One Kitty Care Center offering “everything your cat could ever need in one stylish piece of cat furniture.” This unit features a litter cabinet on the lowest level, play area at the center, feeding station and two large sleeping trays at the top.

Cats Play: over-the-top shopping for kitties

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almost immediately and in American shows by the early 20th century.

Seal points, still the best known variety, were the first to arrive. With their seal brown, almost black extremities and their pale fawn bodies, they were sensational. While chocolate points, with creamy white bodies and milk chocolate legs, tail, mask and ears did appear from time to time, it was the blue point that gained official recognition in 1934. The blue point has a bluish-white body with slate blue points. The chocolate point was recognized next. In 1955 the lilac point followed and completed the breed. The lilac point has pinkish gray points with a white body which makes it most ethereal and delicate in color.

The long Siamese head is delineated by an absolutely straight profile and well aligned chin. From the front, the outline of the face presents a smooth wedge with large ears that complete the wedge.

This ancient breed, perhaps the oldest of all our cats, is able to communicate like no other. The Siamese voice is legendary. They speak both with their voice and with their body. They are the quintessential “people” cat, for they love to be in your lap, on your bed, at your table--and in your heart!

For more information, go to the Cat Fanciers Association.

Siamese cats have fascinated folks around the world since they were first officially exported from Thailand , or Siam as it was then known , in the late 1800s. Their sleek lines, striking color contrast, finely chiseled Siamese cat / kittens aristocratic heads, deep blue almond eyes, and short silky coats make them living art. Combine this beauty with acute intelligence, inquisitive personality and a loving nature and you have the essence of the Siamese cat.

The first Siamese to appear in England were a gift from Siam to an ambassador who brought them home. They began appearing in English cat shows

The Siamese: an old, very popular breed

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America, making it possible to provide all information and services free to both the animal welfare community and the public alike. And, at the same time, PETS 911 does not compete with our shelter and rescue partners for donation dollars.

For the past five years, PETS 911 has partnered with many of the nation's largest animal welfare organizations, such as the Humane Society of the United States, American Humane, The Pet Savers Foundation, SPAY/USA, the Doris Day Animal Foundation, Alley Cat Allies and over 9,500 local shelters and rescues across the country to provide this valuable information to the public.

Media partners, AOL, Clear Channel, Cox Communications, Gannett, Animal Planet, and hundreds of other local newspaper, radio and television stations have included pet content on their Web sites – giving their community even further access to all of PETS 911's life saving content.

If you're ready to adopt a pet, try PETS 911.

Pets 911 logoIf you go to PETS911.com, you will find a great way to find cats and dogs in your area that need homes. Type in your zip code and up come pictures of dozens of cats and dogs sheltered near you that need homes. Included are their names, descriptions, ages, breeds and details. It's a wonderful service. There also are links to local shelters with further pet listings.

PETS 911 consolidates all the adoption, fostering, lost and found, volunteer, shelter/clinic, and health and training information in America and gives the public a single and easy place to find this information. The service is becoming an answer for not only the public, but also the animal welfare community.

PETS 911 is a Web site and a toll-free hotline at
(1-888-PETS-911) that allows everyone to access the important, life-saving information provided. It is a for-profit company, funded 100 percent by corporate

PETS 911 consolidates adoption services in US

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Abyssinian kittens

using a small bell-like voice to communicate. They prefer and seek higher places to sit such as backs of chairs, refrigerators and scratching poles. They get on very well with dogs and will quickly teach the dog who is the boss!

Abys can be taught to fetch and retrieve small objects and, because of their dog like antics, they are often attractive to men who previously thought that they did not like cats. There is no breed of cat more loyal than an Abyssinian.

Pictured at left are kittens raised by Brenda Fye of AbyFye Abyssinians, Bensalem, PA. She has been involved with Abys since 1990. Always being a dog lover, she was drawn to the Abyssinian because their personalities are so loving and fun. She started showing and breeding Abys in CFA in the 90's.

Besides having the good fortune of raising the babies and enjoying their company, she has had much success in producing top show-quality kittens and cats. Her most recent winner is AbyFye's Renegade. He is a Regional Top 10 kitten and he is now a Grand Champion living in Germany.

Contact Brenda Fye at (215) 768-4380.
Email to Hifye@Verizon.net.

The Abyssinian is an affectionate, intelligent cat that is very people orientated, extremely active and thrives on interaction and play. They are not constant lap cats. Rather, they want to do what you're doing, like help you make a telephone call, read your newspaper or make your bed! In fact, they insist on being included in all family activities- as a right. Whatever it is, an Aby has to be totally involved!

Abyssinians make great family pets. They aren't vocal,

Abyssinians make excellent companions

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Jo-Ni Cookie, an American Shorthair Brown Tabby, enjoys the sun while working hard in the Breeders Guide office.

Cookie

The sun, the computer and me

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You all know that I gave away my cat Bill when I left the states. Well, another cat showed up in Taif. I thought I'd share a photo of her when she was about ten weeks old and now as an adult. Her name is Squeaky.

The cats around here look similar to our cats in the US, but I've noticed that, even though we got her so young and tried to teach her manners from the beginning (she's good about staying off the tables and other off-limit places), but she has a fierce streak that seems to be common to the cats here. They are definitely more wild than the cats I'm used to. Still she's a great pet and I'm happy to have a cat in the house again.

We got her because she just showed up in the stable office at Taif out of the blue. Jere told me about her that day but didn't bring her home until the next day when he found her on the stable roof hiding under a concrete block meowing so loudly that he couldn't just leave her there. Seems like that is always the way I get cats.

later, amy

Squeaky

We received the following report from one of our webmasters, Amy Stevens, owner of the horse sales site, www.horsesales.com. Amy and Jere Smith
live in Saudi Arabia. Jere is trainer for the Stables of King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz Sons.

‘Squeaky’ new pet for webmaster in Saudi

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sister, when tiny kittens, were found tossed out on a highway and in very bad shape. The animal shelter refused to take the pathetic pair, so their rescuer gave them to a co-worker, Kitty Clarahan of Bedford, IN, for her birthday. What a very happy day for everyone!


Now Missy lives at the Clarahan’s Twin River Morgans, 420 Starr Lane, Bedford, IN.

Missy’s favorite perch is Twin Rivers Flying Jessica (Windover Regency x Steppin Jessica), a 1998 Morgan mare. Kitty Clarahan reports: “Jessie takes the family on trail rides and carriage drives and nickers, neighs and comes galloping whenever someone is within sight! She kisses and nuzzles whenever she can.”

Jessie, who apparently is happy to serve as a soft, warm perch for many, is also pictured with the Clarahans’ grandson, Tanner Albers.

 

Missy and Tanner on Jessie

Long before Missy Mouse discovered that sitting on a horse’s back is a very nice place to be, she and her

Meet Missy Mouse and Jessica at Twin River Morgans

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Ms Personality
Ms Pers., short for Ms Personality.
  I rescued her as a kitten from the shelter.
Paris
This is Paris. she and Vegas grew up in a vet clinic and were blood donors on several occasions.
Vegas
Vegas is my sweetie.

Felines of Locust Hill Morgans

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Fin-Cats is a small American Shorthair cattery nestled in the Green Mountains of Vermont owned by Heather Finlayson, known most recently in the Morgan community as farm manager at Kelli Ross's Liberation. She was formerly associated with Quaker Hill, Rundale and Figure's Morgan Farm. Heather also raises champion Dachshunds and owns Good Hands, a property and animal management company.

Inspired by the very nature of the American Shorthair breed itself, a balanced, strongly built, medium-sized, personable and working cat, Fin-Cat's goal is to produce healthy, temperamentally and structurally sound individuals, adaptable to our busy lives.
Click here video icon to watch a video.

Pictured is CH Fin-Cats Flossie. Fin-Cats kittens will be available again in December 2005. Owners of Fin-Cat kittens include Ann Hastings of the famous Tug Hill Morgan Farm, breeder of the stallions Tug Hill Whamunition and Tug Hill Celebrity, among many others.

CH Fin-Cats Flossie

Fin-Cats of Vermont

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If you attach a good digital picture of your favorite cat in an email to the Breeders Guide, we'll feature him or her on our new "Cats" page. Please include the cat's name and job description plus your name and contact information, such as email address. Kittens for sale or adoption? Send us pictures!

At the left is Homer, the head barn cat at Full Circle Dressage, Pendleton , KY. He was a "walk on" in 1997.

The Breeders Guide on the Web will be updated regularly with Update Notices emailed to our visitors. Want an update email? Click here. The site is best viewed with high-speed Internet connection. If you have problems viewing, please tell us by clicking here.

Homer

Barn cats. House cats. Show cats. What's life without them?

Cats make purr-fect pets for kids

Adopting a cat? Consider a pair!

Meet Elf, the office cat at Willowbank Farm, Simpsonville, KY.

Love wild look? Then Bengal cats are for you

Experts tell us why and how cats purr

Why do our cats love catnip? Experts explain

Jinx of Willowbank Farm

Barn cats. House cats. Show cats. What's life without them?

Fin-Cats of Vermont

Felines of Locust Hill Morgans

Meet Missy Mouse and Jessica at Twin River Morgans

‘Squeaky’ new pet for webmaster in Saudi

The sun, the computer and me

Abyssinians make excellent companions

PETS 911 consolidates adoption services in US

The Siamese: an old, very popular breed

Cats Play: over-the-top shopping for kitties

Phoenix rises, thanks to his friends

Peaches found her own home!

Cat agility: something new for felines

New ginger kitten for Web master in Saudi

Tabbies: favorites around the world for centuries

 

Cats Archives

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Full Circle Dressage

Duster

These markings then became the dominant tabby pattern. The spotted tabby, while not uncommon, is now usually found only in purebred animals.

The tabby cat, pictured above, is often mistaken as a certain breed of cat. The term “tabby” actually refers to the stripes, dots and swirl patterns of the cat's coat. The tabby pattern is believed to be the original basic cat pattern, and the closest to their distant ancestors.

Tabbies come in two basic colorations: red, brown or ginger tabbies with a rich orange/gold/red coat and silver or grey tabbies with coat coloring including silver/grey/black. The tabby stripes can either take the form of a distinct mackerel or fishbone striping, or they may be more loosely splotched. Alternatively, they may have a spotted coat, which is actually stripes broken up into distinct blotches, or they may be ticked.

The distinct 'M' marking on the forehead is the mark of the true tabby.

Until the 16th century, the spotted tabby with its wild ancestral markings of spots and stripes was the dominant tabby type. During the early 1500s a variant of the spotted tabby appeared, now known as the mackerel tabby with its striped coat, pictured at right

Tabbies: favorites around the world for centuries

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Jinx, pictured here, works in the foaling barn at Willowbank Farm, Simpsonville, KY. He wandered on the farm one day as a skinny ragtag guy and decided to stay. He loves watching everything that goes on, including breeding intern Farrell Palmer of Florida as she takes pictures of the babies. Some of Farrell's pictures are featured on the Home page.

Visit the Willowbank website.

Jinx

Jinx of Willowbank Farm

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Some scents cause strong positive reactions in humans but none approach the power of catnip to influence our feline pets. According to the Drs. Foster & Smith Educational Staff, that's because human brains are physiologically different, and our sense of smell not nearly as refined. And since there is no scent that causes such a powerful reaction in humans, catnip is hard for us to understand.

Catnip is a perennial herb, Nepeta cateria, a member of the mint family. It is not addictive, and is completely safe for cats. The catnip response affects all of the cat's senses - touch, smell, sight, sound, and taste. Usually powerful, the intensity varies widely among cats. The reaction to catnip normally lasts a few minutes, and then the behavior quickly subsides. It can then take an hour or two away from the catnip for the cat to "reset." Then, the same reaction can occur again.

According to the Web site, although no one knows exactly what happens in the cat's brain, it is known that the chemical nepetalactone in catnip triggers the response, kicking off a stereotypical pattern in cats that are sensitive to the chemical. The catnip reaction is inherited in an autosomal dominant gene. Up to a third of adult cats, in which the gene is not present, are totally unaffected by catnip. Kittens under three months of age do not usually react to catnip, either.
Catnip can be found in the wild, grown in herb gardens, or purchased in many dried forms. Most cat owners find using dried catnip in its many configurations to be the most convenient. During summer months catnip is fairly easy to grow. You can allow your cat access to the garden, or harvest leaves and bring them into the house. Catnip may also be grown in indoor gardens, providing a fresh supply of leaves, and possibly distracting cats from chewing ornamental houseplants.
Go to the Dr. Foster and Smith Web site to learn more.

Why do our cats love catnip? Experts explain

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Anne Wyland of Ancan Morgans, Davison, MI is definitely a cat lover. Pictured above are two of her charmers, Jubilee and Sonic. Over the next few weeks we’ll be featuring several more of the Ancan felines, most who wandered on to her farm – and stayed.
Anne’s palomino Morgan stallion, Ancan True Colors, is featured now on the Morgan page. Also go to the Ancan web site for a farm tour at www.ancanmorgans.com

Cats find great homes at Ancan Morgans in MI

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According to the Drs Foster and Smith website , there are three reasons why cats purr: contentment, comfort and security.

Behaviorists believe the original function of purring was to enable a kitten to tell his mother that "all is well." This often occurs during nursing. A kitten can't meow and nurse at the same time, but can purr and nurse without any problem. The mother often purrs back, reassuring the kitten using this tactile, resonant communication. This is why your cat purrs when petted, instinctively giving the signal "all is well," a message you can both feel and hear.
But this isn’t the only message purring may signal: Older cats purr when they play or approach other cats, signaling they are friendly and want to come closer.

Cats also purr when they are distressed or afraid. Sick and injured cats and those in veterinary offices often purr. It is thought that this is the cat's way of reassuring and calming herself. But how do they purr? There are two schools of thought, according to the Psychology of Purring: One study determined that purring involves activation of nerves within the voice box. These nerve signals cause vibration of the vocal cords while the diaphragm serves as a piston pump, pushing air in and out of the vibrating cords, thus creating a musical hum. Veterinarian Neils C. Pederson, author of Feline Husbandry, believes that purring is initiated from within the central nervous system and is a voluntary act. In other words, cats purr only when they want to.
The other theory is that the sound comes more from vibrating blood vessels than in the voice box itself.

Experts tell us why and how cats purr

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Bengal kittens are very self confident, outgoing, intelligent, loving and are quick to learn. They quickly bond with people of all ages and get along well with a wide variety of family pets. Their nutritional and immunization requirements are the same as for all domestic household cats.

Contact Bill and Cathy Brown at 151 Goody Lane, Midland City, AL 36350(334) 712-0342. Email to info@millcreekbengals.com.

Interested in owning a cat that looks wild, but isn’t? The Bengal may be just the cat for you.

The very unique genetic legacy of the Bengal, together with rigorous breeding programs, have produced a breed of cat with a singular, distinctive, wild look, exceptional personality and atypical behavior. It is this special personality and behavior, coupled with their wild visual appearance, that make the Bengal so desirable.

The typical Bengal cat is medium to large in size with a sturdy, muscular body. The males are slightly heavier and larger than the females.

Bill and Cathy Brown, Bagherra Cattery of Midland City, AL, breed Bengal cats. All their cats are special to them and are friends and companions. The Browns are dedicated to creating the most beautiful, well socialized Bengal cats and kittens available. Their goal is to produce kittens that are as close to the TICA Bengal standard as is possible.

The Browns handle their kittens early and often to assure they are well socialized and make excellent and reliable pets.

Love wild look? Then Bengal cats are for you

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Meet Elf,
the office cat
at Willowbank Farm,
Simpsonville, KY.

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with playing resulting in needed exercise and their falling asleep too.
Kittens need and want interaction with other kittens. This is how they learn how to play, hunt, and be physically, emotionally, and socially well-adjusted cats.
If an older cat is in the household already, a kitten should not be brought in as a lone companion. Kittens have tons of energy and want to play constantly. This is overwhelming for older cats.
Forcing a cat to be "an only child" is a mistake in most cases and should be considered knowing all the potential problems. Take two!
If you looking for a new member of your family and you have decided it would be best to get a young cat or a kitten, consider adopting two young cats or kittens rather than just "an only child" or a companion to your older cat.
It’s very hard to keep a single kitten occupied, safe and happy while you are busy with your daily life. If a young cat or kitten is bored, behavior problems arise such as biting, scratching, pouncing, and marking! Remember kittens are born in litters and are used to companionship right from the beginning.
Cats are very social animals and are truly happier living with other cat companions. Think big cats, lions for example live in large groups called prides, so a single kitty will be lonely! When you want to pay bills, talk on the phone, help children with homework, etc. that lonely kitten/cat will be demanding your time and attention.
Cats tend to sleep up to 18 hours a day and are most active at night. Two cats/kittens will play with each other

Adopting a cat? Consider a pair!

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Growing up with a cat can be a wonderful experience for kids. It can teach them responsibility and empathy, and provide them with a loving friend and confidante.
Most kids under age 12 aren't ready to become the primary caretaker of an animal, however. You or another adult will have to take ultimate responsibility for making sure your cat's basic needs are met. Let your child help in ways that are appropriate for his age: A preschooler can help dish out the cat's dinner, while a 10-year-old can handle the daily brushing chores.
You can set the stage for a successful relationship by preparing your child for the new arrival:

Talk to your child about cats. Read some age-appropriate books about cats and how to care for them. Talk about what you'll all need to do to keep your cat healthy and happy.

Visit friends who own cats. If your child hasn't been in the company of cats, spend some time with feline-owning friends. This will help your child develop realistic expectations and show her how to handle and care for a cat.

Explain the commitment you're making. Make sure your child understands that pets aren't something to play with for a while and then toss aside -- adopting a cat means promising to care for the animal for its lifetime.

• Give him a sense of ownership. Create the beginning of a bond by involving your child in some decisions: Ask her to suggest possible names for your new pet, or let her pick out food and water dishes.

Cats make purr-fect pets for kids


Pictured here is blue classic tabby American Shorthair Stevie Ray with his kid, five-year-old Luke Hubbard of Leesburg, VA.

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